Category: Education

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Civil Rights and Apartheid

Coinciding with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Democracy Now! and Pacifica Radio Archives shared a recently re-discovered speech by Dr. King.

On his way to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize , Dr. King stopped in London and delivered a speech to the Christian Action group on December 7, 1964. In this speech, Dr. King connected the history of American segregation and the Civil Rights movement with the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. The speech was recorded by Saul Bernstein, then a correspondent for Pacifica Radio. Roughly 50 years later, the speech was re-discovered in the Pacifica Radio Archives. This morning, Democracy Now! shared the speech.

Listen to the speech above; a full transcript of the speech (and the broadcast) is available at the Democracy Now! site.

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Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

In the rush to explain the outcome of Election 2016, “fake news” has become one of the main front page topics in mainstream media. One response has been to call for censoring such outlets. However, as the Association of Moving Image Archivists’ Board of Directors recently pointed out, the information and library science field’s focus on media literacy can also be a useful tool for everyone on the receiving end of the news.

The AMIA Board’s note calls attention to an article written by Louise Lief. Lief, writing for The Columbia Journalism Review a month prior to the election, suggests that the journalism world take a cue from libraries in promoting information literacy. Lief’s article centers on how journalists can use such tools to improve both their credibility and the quality of their reporting.

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRLU)’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education outlines one such framework for developing information literacy tools and skills. The Framework is directed at educators and librarians and emphasizes a holistic interrogation of information. A practitioner considers context, process, authority, and value, while using community, communication, and iterative questions to better understanding.

Or, American University’s Public Affairs Librarian Olivia Ivey gives the tl; dr version: “Says who? Based on what authority? What evidence?”

In the academic world, such principles have been used to help combat plagiarism. The media world—and by extension anyone who consumes media—can use these same principles to navigate the deluge of media information.

PDF of the paper here; the ACRL provides a summary here.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

#StandingRockSyllabus

The NYC Stands with Standing Rock Collective’s#StandingRockSyllabus is both a guide to understanding the current resistance against the Dakota Access Pipeline, as well as a comprehensive resource outlining the connections between indigenous peoples’ rights, colonialism, private property, fossil fuel demand, environmental conservation, and many other concepts.

Twitter users can search the hashtag for a growing number of references. However, NYC Stands with Standing Rock Collective’s site is a rich resource on its own. It includes a number of useful charts and visualizations, as well as PDF versions of the syllabus with and without recommended readings.

Black Lives Matter Syllabus

Like Public Books’ Trump Syllabus 2.0, Prof. Frank Leon Roberts’ Black Lives Matter (BLM) Syllabus comes from the pre-11/9. And, of course, is not specifically about the 2016 Election. That said, given the subsequent liberal call-to-arms following 11/9, BLM is even more relevant now for understanding the nature of injustice in this country.

The online version is in standard syllabus form, but also contains useful video resources.

The BLM Syllabus in PDF form is here: black-lives-matter-fall-2016-syllabus-black-lives-matter-syllabus

Trump Syllabus 2.0

Reading is a staple recommendation, but a number of lists are light on research and/or rely too heavily on recent releases (and subsequently read like a publisher’s marketing copy). There have been a handful of rigorous syllabi worth exploring.

Public Books’ “Trump Syllabus 2.0,” published on 28 June 2016, was a response to The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s version from a week prior. Though published about a month prior to the national conventions, the 2.0 syllabus covers much of the necessary ground to understand the ascent of Trump. It is immensely broad and, as its schedule suggests, could easily take four months to cover. The weekly topics alone are a useful framework for understanding the breadth of the problems of Trump’s campaign: white power, Islamophobia, national security, anti-Mexican sentiment, misogyny, etc.

Syllabus in PDF form here: public-books-trump-syllabus-2

SPLC Election 2016 Resources

Teaching Tolerance, an educational resource of the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), created an excellent, broad online resource for the 2016 Election. While the format is geared towards professional educators, the material is rich enough to merit everyone’s time.

The resource is divided into several subject areas: Countering Bias; Civic Activities; Getting Along; How To (or, how teachers can cover the election in class); and Election Sites. Every section mixes research, media, storytelling, activities, direct action, and much more—in short, there are a number of entry points for users. Post-Election Day, the Election Sites section may seem of less use, but it still deserves attention, given the current level of interest and attention upon the election process.

The entire Teaching Tolerance project, which has been in existence since 1991, is remarkable and worth your time. The site is updated regularly, so it is worth bookmarking, adding to your RSS feed, etc. And, of course, the SPLC is very deserving of your support.