Tag: Education

Holy Fuck The Election

As previously mentioned the wealth of resources for facing the coming Trump administration means there is something for every activist. Clara Beyer’s Holy Fuck is the most aptly-named resource of the bunch (kudos to the melanin in that middle finger emoji), as well as one of the most structurally streamlined and intelligently written.

Users are first asked, “Are You Okay?” to gauge whether some self-help (in the form of puppy & kitten videos, topical coloring books, or inspirational Buzzfeed ‘content’)  is needed or whether one is “ready to fuck shit up.” The latter response feeds into several banner issues that arose during the election cycle: increasing Democrat representation, racism, LGBTQ, misogyny/sexual assault, and climate change. Each topic is sub-divided by whether the user can spare “money” or “time,” and then branches out again to other resources to explore.

The tone of the site strikes a balance of outrage, humor, and compassion, which is helpful for people less familiar or put-off by the language of progressive politics and/or activism.

 

What Do I Do About Trump?

Less than a month after Election 2016 there are already a number of fantastic resources for collecting one’s thoughts, researching issues, and taking concrete steps to plan a full-court press on the coming Trump Administration.

One site that collects a broad range of resources is What Do I Do About Trump?  The site emphasizes individual and collective action. Individuals looking to commit to a document can create a customized action plan via the “Make A Plan” section. Individuals looking to browse different methods of activism can explore the “Get Involved” section, which links to resources ranging from prescribed daily/weekly action listscalling elected officials, interpersonal connections, and more.

Of note is the “Protect Yourself” section on security. There are separate sections based on types of security—web, sexual/gender identity, personal—all of which are worth investigation, regardless of one’s background.

Also worth highlighting is the site’s resources for fostering new collective/group action. The “Inspire Friends” section provides resources for creating “Action Pods” to structure, support, and direct the energies of an individual and a manageable number of loved ones.

Thanks to Marit for sharing this and several other fantastic resources (which will be shared in the coming days)!

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

In the rush to explain the outcome of Election 2016, “fake news” has become one of the main front page topics in mainstream media. One response has been to call for censoring such outlets. However, as the Association of Moving Image Archivists’ Board of Directors recently pointed out, the information and library science field’s focus on media literacy can also be a useful tool for everyone on the receiving end of the news.

The AMIA Board’s note calls attention to an article written by Louise Lief. Lief, writing for The Columbia Journalism Review a month prior to the election, suggests that the journalism world take a cue from libraries in promoting information literacy. Lief’s article centers on how journalists can use such tools to improve both their credibility and the quality of their reporting.

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRLU)’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education outlines one such framework for developing information literacy tools and skills. The Framework is directed at educators and librarians and emphasizes a holistic interrogation of information. A practitioner considers context, process, authority, and value, while using community, communication, and iterative questions to better understanding.

Or, American University’s Public Affairs Librarian Olivia Ivey gives the tl; dr version: “Says who? Based on what authority? What evidence?”

In the academic world, such principles have been used to help combat plagiarism. The media world—and by extension anyone who consumes media—can use these same principles to navigate the deluge of media information.

PDF of the paper here; the ACRL provides a summary here.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Black Lives Matter Syllabus

Like Public Books’ Trump Syllabus 2.0, Prof. Frank Leon Roberts’ Black Lives Matter (BLM) Syllabus comes from the pre-11/9. And, of course, is not specifically about the 2016 Election. That said, given the subsequent liberal call-to-arms following 11/9, BLM is even more relevant now for understanding the nature of injustice in this country.

The online version is in standard syllabus form, but also contains useful video resources.

The BLM Syllabus in PDF form is here: black-lives-matter-fall-2016-syllabus-black-lives-matter-syllabus

Trump Syllabus 2.0

Reading is a staple recommendation, but a number of lists are light on research and/or rely too heavily on recent releases (and subsequently read like a publisher’s marketing copy). There have been a handful of rigorous syllabi worth exploring.

Public Books’ “Trump Syllabus 2.0,” published on 28 June 2016, was a response to The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s version from a week prior. Though published about a month prior to the national conventions, the 2.0 syllabus covers much of the necessary ground to understand the ascent of Trump. It is immensely broad and, as its schedule suggests, could easily take four months to cover. The weekly topics alone are a useful framework for understanding the breadth of the problems of Trump’s campaign: white power, Islamophobia, national security, anti-Mexican sentiment, misogyny, etc.

Syllabus in PDF form here: public-books-trump-syllabus-2