Tag: racism

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Civil Rights and Apartheid

Coinciding with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Democracy Now! and Pacifica Radio Archives shared a recently re-discovered speech by Dr. King.

On his way to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize , Dr. King stopped in London and delivered a speech to the Christian Action group on December 7, 1964. In this speech, Dr. King connected the history of American segregation and the Civil Rights movement with the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. The speech was recorded by Saul Bernstein, then a correspondent for Pacifica Radio. Roughly 50 years later, the speech was re-discovered in the Pacifica Radio Archives. This morning, Democracy Now! shared the speech.

Listen to the speech above; a full transcript of the speech (and the broadcast) is available at the Democracy Now! site.

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Holy Fuck The Election

As previously mentioned the wealth of resources for facing the coming Trump administration means there is something for every activist. Clara Beyer’s Holy Fuck is the most aptly-named resource of the bunch (kudos to the melanin in that middle finger emoji), as well as one of the most structurally streamlined and intelligently written.

Users are first asked, “Are You Okay?” to gauge whether some self-help (in the form of puppy & kitten videos, topical coloring books, or inspirational Buzzfeed ‘content’)  is needed or whether one is “ready to fuck shit up.” The latter response feeds into several banner issues that arose during the election cycle: increasing Democrat representation, racism, LGBTQ, misogyny/sexual assault, and climate change. Each topic is sub-divided by whether the user can spare “money” or “time,” and then branches out again to other resources to explore.

The tone of the site strikes a balance of outrage, humor, and compassion, which is helpful for people less familiar or put-off by the language of progressive politics and/or activism.

 

#StandingRockSyllabus

The NYC Stands with Standing Rock Collective’s#StandingRockSyllabus is both a guide to understanding the current resistance against the Dakota Access Pipeline, as well as a comprehensive resource outlining the connections between indigenous peoples’ rights, colonialism, private property, fossil fuel demand, environmental conservation, and many other concepts.

Twitter users can search the hashtag for a growing number of references. However, NYC Stands with Standing Rock Collective’s site is a rich resource on its own. It includes a number of useful charts and visualizations, as well as PDF versions of the syllabus with and without recommended readings.

Black Lives Matter Syllabus

Like Public Books’ Trump Syllabus 2.0, Prof. Frank Leon Roberts’ Black Lives Matter (BLM) Syllabus comes from the pre-11/9. And, of course, is not specifically about the 2016 Election. That said, given the subsequent liberal call-to-arms following 11/9, BLM is even more relevant now for understanding the nature of injustice in this country.

The online version is in standard syllabus form, but also contains useful video resources.

The BLM Syllabus in PDF form is here: black-lives-matter-fall-2016-syllabus-black-lives-matter-syllabus

Trump Syllabus 2.0

Reading is a staple recommendation, but a number of lists are light on research and/or rely too heavily on recent releases (and subsequently read like a publisher’s marketing copy). There have been a handful of rigorous syllabi worth exploring.

Public Books’ “Trump Syllabus 2.0,” published on 28 June 2016, was a response to The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s version from a week prior. Though published about a month prior to the national conventions, the 2.0 syllabus covers much of the necessary ground to understand the ascent of Trump. It is immensely broad and, as its schedule suggests, could easily take four months to cover. The weekly topics alone are a useful framework for understanding the breadth of the problems of Trump’s campaign: white power, Islamophobia, national security, anti-Mexican sentiment, misogyny, etc.

Syllabus in PDF form here: public-books-trump-syllabus-2

SPLC Election 2016 Resources

Teaching Tolerance, an educational resource of the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), created an excellent, broad online resource for the 2016 Election. While the format is geared towards professional educators, the material is rich enough to merit everyone’s time.

The resource is divided into several subject areas: Countering Bias; Civic Activities; Getting Along; How To (or, how teachers can cover the election in class); and Election Sites. Every section mixes research, media, storytelling, activities, direct action, and much more—in short, there are a number of entry points for users. Post-Election Day, the Election Sites section may seem of less use, but it still deserves attention, given the current level of interest and attention upon the election process.

The entire Teaching Tolerance project, which has been in existence since 1991, is remarkable and worth your time. The site is updated regularly, so it is worth bookmarking, adding to your RSS feed, etc. And, of course, the SPLC is very deserving of your support.

What to do if you are witnessing Islamophobic harassment

maeril_islamophobia

Artist and illustrator Maeril published this excellent comic instructional detailing how to intervene when witnessing Islamophobic harassment in late August 2016. Within days of Election 2016, the comic found a new life on social media.

Anyone with an ounce of empathy will note that the technique demonstrated here can be applied to any number of types of harassment. Maeril concedes this point, but notes the comic focuses specifically on Muslims in France, where Islamophobia is experiencing a considerable surge.Sadly, this is also the case here in the States; the section of the FBI report on victims of hate crimes in 2015 is here.