Tag: to do list

Holy Fuck The Election

As previously mentioned the wealth of resources for facing the coming Trump administration means there is something for every activist. Clara Beyer’s Holy Fuck is the most aptly-named resource of the bunch (kudos to the melanin in that middle finger emoji), as well as one of the most structurally streamlined and intelligently written.

Users are first asked, “Are You Okay?” to gauge whether some self-help (in the form of puppy & kitten videos, topical coloring books, or inspirational Buzzfeed ‘content’)  is needed or whether one is “ready to fuck shit up.” The latter response feeds into several banner issues that arose during the election cycle: increasing Democrat representation, racism, LGBTQ, misogyny/sexual assault, and climate change. Each topic is sub-divided by whether the user can spare “money” or “time,” and then branches out again to other resources to explore.

The tone of the site strikes a balance of outrage, humor, and compassion, which is helpful for people less familiar or put-off by the language of progressive politics and/or activism.

 

What Do I Do About Trump?

Less than a month after Election 2016 there are already a number of fantastic resources for collecting one’s thoughts, researching issues, and taking concrete steps to plan a full-court press on the coming Trump Administration.

One site that collects a broad range of resources is What Do I Do About Trump?  The site emphasizes individual and collective action. Individuals looking to commit to a document can create a customized action plan via the “Make A Plan” section. Individuals looking to browse different methods of activism can explore the “Get Involved” section, which links to resources ranging from prescribed daily/weekly action listscalling elected officials, interpersonal connections, and more.

Of note is the “Protect Yourself” section on security. There are separate sections based on types of security—web, sexual/gender identity, personal—all of which are worth investigation, regardless of one’s background.

Also worth highlighting is the site’s resources for fostering new collective/group action. The “Inspire Friends” section provides resources for creating “Action Pods” to structure, support, and direct the energies of an individual and a manageable number of loved ones.

Thanks to Marit for sharing this and several other fantastic resources (which will be shared in the coming days)!

Questions to Ask Loved Ones Who Voted the Other Way

The New York Times’ Michael Barbaro hosted The Run-Up podcast to discuss Election 2016 in the weeks leading up to 9 November. Since the election, Barbaro continues to produce episodes that explore the aftermath. Just in time for the late-November holidays when numerous families reunite, the 18 November podcast outlined a script for facilitating potentially difficult conversations with family members who voted differently.

The likelihood of a person memorizing this script or carrying it with them while talking seems low. However, a key takeaway from reading through the nineteen questions is to focus on 1) the relationship between those speaking; 2) one’s feelings about policies and the status of the country; and 3) the impact of those feelings on the relationship between the speakers. The technique is a helpful reminder to stray away from behaving like surrogates for a candidate, but to instead have a conversation about the state of the country while keeping the sanctity of the relationship rooted.

The entire script is on the podcast website, and the podcast itself recorded conversations with pairs of Clinton and Trump voters.

Proactive Things To Do

The Proactive things to do to not be defeated by the next 4 years is a starting point for those approaching the Trump election from the perspective of, “Fuck, how do I help un-fuck this situation?” It’s literally a simple to-do list of modest actions.

The list highlights bureaucratic protest (e.g., calling elected officials), administrative tasks (filing labor complaints, downloading public data sets) and daily routines (media consumption, donating) that seem mundane, but can form the basis for solving larger problems down the road. Some of these tasks are manageable and easily actionable, which can give clear guidance and goals for the user. Others make assumptions about users’ access to resources (paying parking tickets, clearing criminal records). Most of these are best viewed as individual long-term tasks to incrementally chip away at injustice.

Some notes are geared towards white people, with its mention of being an accomplice and not an ally, and for recommending the SNL episode hosted by Dave Chappelle (“You guys aren’t as full of surprises as you used to be“).

I came across the list on Facebook and I can’t trace where I found this, so I can’t provide source information. Anyone recall where this came from?

 

Call Sheet

The “We’re His Problem Now” Calling Sheet is one of many to-do lists widely circulated on social media, but is notable for its clear step-by-step instructions and careful detail to maximize impact. The spreadsheet is divided into several tabs that walk the user through:

  • Goals and strategy (“Start Here”)
  • Schedule (“Weekly Call to Action”)
  • How to call (“Calling Scripts”)
  • Whom to call [“Contact Info Party Leadership,” “Contact Your Senator (Incumbents),” “Contact Your Rep (Incumbents)”]

 

What to do if you are witnessing Islamophobic harassment

maeril_islamophobia

Artist and illustrator Maeril published this excellent comic instructional detailing how to intervene when witnessing Islamophobic harassment in late August 2016. Within days of Election 2016, the comic found a new life on social media.

Anyone with an ounce of empathy will note that the technique demonstrated here can be applied to any number of types of harassment. Maeril concedes this point, but notes the comic focuses specifically on Muslims in France, where Islamophobia is experiencing a considerable surge.Sadly, this is also the case here in the States; the section of the FBI report on victims of hate crimes in 2015 is here.